CHANGE AGENDA FOR ANIMALS


New Offices


Animal Protection Liaison in White House—appoint an Animal Protection Liaison in the White House, similar to the new position announced for Carol Browner and/or the Council on Environmental Quality, to help coordinate animal protection concerns (policy issues, legislation, and regulations affecting animals cut across several different agencies – Agriculture, Interior, Commerce, EPA, HHS, State, Transportation, HUD, DOD, FTC, Education, etc.)  

Animal Protection Division in the Justice Department—appoint an additional Assistant U.S. Attorney to head a new Animal Protection Division in the Justice Department, similar to the Civil Rights Division, to ensure strong enforcement of federal animal protection laws


Agency Issues
(numbering is for organizational purposes only and is not a ranking in order of importance)


U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

1) Humane poultry slaughter—apply law to cover poultry so that 9 billion birds per year – 95% of all farm animals slaughtered for food in the U.S. – get basic protection from cruel and abusive treatment in their final moments (Obama pledged during campaign, in response to Humane Society Legislative Fund (HSLF) survey, to support action to assure that poultry are rendered insensible to pain prior to being killed); guide industry transition to Controlled Atmosphere Killing methods that, when done using a proper mix of gases, provide a more humane end, and yield higher productivity (e.g., fewer broken bones as animals aren’t struggling) and fewer workplace injuries for the staff

2) Downers and slaughter plant oversight—immediately finalize rule closing loophole and comprehensively banning slaughter of any downed cattle; substantially rework slaughter plant oversight systems to address problems highlighted in our investigations and ensure inspectors are actually observing treatment of live animals and enforcing compliance; establish ombudsman to protect field inspectors from retribution when they report problems; “increase funding for meat inspectors to ensure compliance with current federal laws” (Obama quote from interview with Chef Ari, “Barack’s Chili,” North Coast Journal, 5/29/08); consider using undercover “SWAT” teams and/or video surveillance to supplement regular inspections; expand downer ban to cover other livestock species, require immediate humane euthanasia, and apply downer ban to auctions, markets, stockyards, and on livestock trucks

3) Enforcement—immediately begin enforcing puppy import restriction, as required under 2008 Farm Bill but not implemented by Bush Administration; increase oversight of key federal laws (Humane Methods of Slaughter Act; Animal Welfare Act (AWA), including provisions on animal fighting, puppy mills, research facilities, zoos, circuses, aquariums and captive marine mammal facilities, medical sales demonstrations, and airlines; Horse Protection Act, which hasn’t had an inflation adjustment in decades; 28 Hour Law; horse transport law; etc.); submit strong President’s budget requests for enforcement of these key laws, as pledged during campaign in response to HSLF survey; impose strong penalties (not suspension of fines, as is so typical now); improve transparency – e.g., update website to accurately reflect and publicize changes in the AWA (enacted in May 2007 and May 2008); resume issuance of press releases on enforcement actions to maximize deterrent impact; process Freedom of Information Act requests expeditiously; promptly post comprehensive annual reports on Animal Care enforcement activities, individual research facility annual reports, and inspection reports for all regulated entities on website

4) Horse slaughter—voice support for legislation to institute a permanent ban on horse slaughter and exports of horses for slaughter for human consumption, as pledged during campaign in response to HSLF survey; enforce ban on export of horses destined for slaughter, consistent with the will of Congress that USDA circumvented in 2006; rescind rule allowing fee-for-service inspections at U.S. slaughter plants; until ban is in effect, implement USDA’s proposed policy on the use of double-decker trucks (to expand their prohibited use to all intermediary points en route to slaughter, not just on the final leg of the trip to slaughter, as is currently the case)
 
5) Puppy mills—require all commercial dog and cat breeders to comply with AWA requirements, including those who sell directly to the public (as provided by legislation like S. 3519 / H.R. 6949 in the 110th Congress, for which Obama pledged support during campaign in response to HSLF survey); require daily exercise and socialization for animals in commercial breeding facilities; prohibit non-stop breeding every heat cycle; prohibit debarking or other invasive procedures conducted for purposes other than the health and well-being of the individual animal; require that humane euthanasia and surgical procedures be performed by a licensed veterinarian only and prohibit other forms of killing animals at these facilities

6) Class B dealers—call for an end to use of dogs and cats obtained through Class B dealers and their “random sources,” including pet theft and fraudulent response to free-to-good home ads; voice support for legislation, as pledged during campaign in response to HSLF survey; stop granting/renewing licenses for Class B dealers to sell random source dogs and cats

7) Horse Protection Act—significantly boost enforcement budget (inflation adjustment for funding that hasn’t changed over decades) and prosecution of cases; eliminate industry self-policing “Designated Qualified Persons” (DQP) system; adopt “gold standard” for interpreting Scar Rule regulation; update HPA regulations; implement proposed inspection technologies and protocols

8) Intensive confinement/on-the-farm animal welfare—support efforts to phase out intensive confinement (like Prop 2, approved overwhelmingly by voters in California), as recommended by the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production; for poultry, this is a key step for reducing risk of a bird flu pandemic; phasing out intensive confinement can also help preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics that are now massively overused to keep animals from getting sick in overcrowded, unsanitary factory farms; establish basic animal welfare specifications that suppliers of meat, dairy, and egg products to federal programs must meet (along the lines of H.R. 1726 in 110th Congress) as part of federal procurement contract terms

9) Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) and climate change—“strictly monitor and regulate pollution from large factory farms, with tough fines for those that violate environmental standards…[and] support efforts to provide more meaningful local control over these factory farms” (quote from Obama, North Coast Journal, 5/29/08); support reversal of Bush Administration EPA final rule exempting CAFOs from federal reporting requirements on emissions and ensure that CAFOs aren’t exempted from environmental laws, including new laws addressing climate change, as well as Community Right-to-Know and Superfund; establish strict subsidy caps to prevent large factory farms from getting limited taxpayer resources to clean up pollution they generate and to bolster sustainable small-scale family farms (consistent with Obama website), as recommended by the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production; these measures will not only improve the lives of animals but will also lead to environmental improvements and benefits for rural communities

10) Wildlife Services—shift focus and resources to non-lethal methods that can be more effective, less expensive, and far more humane; end use of Compound 1080, M44s, and other toxicants (e.g., DRC1339, Starlicide, and Avitrol) in order to prevent terrible suffering by wildlife and unintended targets including pets, endangered species, and children and prevent access to highly toxic poisons by terrorists; end use of aerial gunning

11) Wild animal exhibitions/USDA licensees—prohibit public physical contact with big cats, primates, and elephants (including elephant rides) to protect public health and safety; prohibit the use by USDA licensees of inappropriate training devices that cause injury and harm to wild animals, including the ankus or bullhook, electric prod, and taser; eliminate traveling exhibits for big cats and elephants (the needs of these species cannot be met while traveling and they cannot be cared for safely during weather and other emergencies), or at least prohibit chaining and require exercise periods, climate-controlled vehicles, and itineraries whenever any wild animals travel, rather than just if they’ll be away for more than 72 hours, as currently required; require separate licenses for each type of animal (big cats, primates, etc.) because an exhibitor qualified to keep one species might not be qualified to keep another

12) Imported live wild animal quarantine—require quarantine of all live wild animals imported to the U.S. (such as those imported as exotic pets) in order to prevent the introduction into the U.S. of pathogens that might be harmful to agriculture, people, and other animals

13) Swim-with-the-dolphin (SWTD) regulations—publish and finalize new regulations to govern the conduct of SWTD sessions (enforcement of regulations published in 1998 was suspended in spring 1999; despite promises since to amend and reissue them, nothing has happened in almost a decade and SWTD programs remain effectively unregulated)

14) Pain and Distress—define "distress" and revise the official categorization system for painful or distressful experimentation, to ensure greater accuracy, consistency, transparency, and attention to animal welfare when research facilities submit their annual reports to the agency

15) Psychological well-being of nonhuman primates—improve regulations regarding the psychological well-being of nonhuman primates so that entities are required to meet clear outcomes that can be enforced by the agency, as was intended by Congress under the 1985 amendments to the AWA (current requirements are vague and very difficult to legally enforce, resulting in primates who are suffering in laboratories with little recourse)

16) Cloning—reevaluate approval of food from cloned animals, taking into consideration animal welfare (this reproductive strategy has resulted in a litany of maladies for the cloned animals and surrogate mothers, including stillbirths, deformities, diseases, and premature deaths); require labeling of any cloned food product, including progeny

17) Microchips—develop regulations (as directed in the FY06 Agriculture Appropriations bill) that will allow for universal reading ability by pet microchip scanners so that scanners can read any chip and microchipping can be more reliable, affordable, and effective in reuniting lost pets with their families; require microchipping for big cats and other wild animals kept by USDA licensees

18) AWA species—support efforts to include all vertebrates under Animal Welfare Act


Interior

19) Endangered Species Act (ESA) rule—reverse Bush Administration final rule empowering other agencies to bypass Fish & Wildlife Service in determining environmental impacts

20) ESA listings—add and retain species listings, and designate critical habitat for listed species, as required using sound science; rescind last-minute Bush Administration decision to strip wolves in both Rocky Mountain and Great Lakes populations of ESA protections; strengthen federal oversight of recovery efforts for wolves and grizzly bears; list the entire species of chimpanzees as endangered (currently, wild chimpanzee populations are listed as endangered while captive chimpanzee populations are listed as threatened)

21) Wild horses—revamp Wild Horse and Burro Program; actively encourage broader implementation of immunocontraception program as a long-term solution to eliminate round-ups, removal and “storage” of wild horses, including funding for the Bureau of Land Management to use this approach as pledged during campaign in response to HSLF survey; reintroduce captive wild horses to areas where they were eliminated due to aggressive round-up policies in past administrations; develop more effective marketing for adoption program

22) Global warming—contribute to efforts to avert global disaster and address specific risks and needs facing wildlife from climate change

23) Polar bear imports—grant no permits to trophy hunters (and set record straight on science re: impact of quotas and sustainability of Canada’s management program); vigorously defend ESA listing of polar bears and consequent prohibition on import of sport-hunted polar bear trophies against ongoing court challenges

24) Yellowstone bison—end cruel round-ups and slaughter of bison from public lands; encourage implementation of a fertility control program using the immunocontraceptive vaccine PZP

25) Hunting in National Parks—in order to protect wildlife from poaching and ensure public safety, reverse final rule by Bush Administration that undid a longstanding ban on carrying of loaded, concealed weapons in National Parks; continue the historic prohibition on sport hunting in national parks, and prevent attempts to allow private sport hunters to target elk in Rocky Mountain National Park and Theodore Roosevelt National Park; oppose legislation like H.R. 1179, S. 917, and S. 684 in the 110th Congress that would open National Parks to sport hunters

26) Hunting on National Wildlife Refuges—do not open or expand any new hunting or trapping programs on refuges and other public lands, and phase out such programs where allowed by law

27) Exotic pet trade—prohibit importation and interstate commerce in exotic species for the pet trade; accelerate consideration and listing of pythons, boa constrictors, and anacondas as injurious species, barred from importation and interstate commerce for the pet trade

28) Overseas exhibitions—stop issuing permits for export and reimport of endangered animals for exhibition purposes, which do not serve to enhance the survival of the species as required under the ESA

29) REPAIR (Refuge Ecology Protection, Assistance, and Immediate Response Act—H.R. 767 /
S. 3366 in 110th Congress) – help ensure that efforts to eliminate “invasive species” are focused on plants, not animals (e.g., wild horses and feral cats)

30) Migratory Bird Treaty Act—support increase in penalties (as provided by H.R. 4093 in 110th Congress) and aggressive enforcement of this important treaty

31) Wildlife penning—support legislation to bar interstate commerce of animals used in wildlife penning (fenced enclosures in which wild animals are torn apart by packs of dogs in competitive animal fights); or interpret federal animal fighting prohibition to cover this activity

32) Transfer Wildlife Services back to Interior—seek funding in President’s Budget for Interior Department (rather than USDA) to handle federal assistance on predator control and other wildlife management

33) Non-lethal predator control—encourage use of non-lethal methods that are humane and can be more effective and less costly over time; end use of Compound 1080, M44s, and other toxicants (e.g., DRC1339, Starlicide, and Avitrol) that pose unacceptable national security risks and cause terrible suffering for wildlife as well as unintended targets, including endangered species, pets, and children; bar shooting of predators from aircraft except in limited cases involving a designated biological emergency; seek humane resolution of conflicts involving wildlife in National Parks

34) The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)—seek to increase CITES protection for the African elephant and oppose proposals to allow  ivory trade; seek to increase CITES protection for tigers by taking measures necessary to stop other countries from breeding tigers for commercial sale in their parts and products, and to ensure that China retains its domestic trade ban on tiger parts and products; seek to increase CITES protection for whales and oppose proposals to allow whale trade; protect leopards, cheetahs, rhinos and other species by opposing and advocating against proposals to increase trophy hunting export quotas; and work to ensure the neutrality and transparency of the CITES Secretariat

35) Reptile and amphibian transport—publish Humane and Healthful Transport regulations to ensure that any live reptiles and amphibians imported to the U.S. are not subject to cruel conditions during transport, as required by the Lacey Act

36) Bear trade—support the Bear Protection Act (H.R. 5534 in 110th Congress), as pledged during campaign in response to HSLF survey, to amend the Lacey Act to extend its protections to bears illegally killed for their viscera

37) Import reviews—review the scientific basis for allowing the importation of each of the following: leopards, African elephants, and bonteboks; act on petitions received to prohibit the importation of non-CITES species of birds under the Wild Bird Conservation Act; review the scientific basis for allowing imports of wildlife from Zimbabwe

38) Enforcement—increase allocation of funds to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for enforcement of wildlife protection laws and regulations; significantly increase physical inspection of wildlife shipments being imported and exported; step up enforcement against traffickers in elephant ivory; focus on Internet wildlife trade


Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

39) CAFOs and climate change—reverse Bush Administration final rule exempting CAFOs from federal reporting requirements on emissions; ensure that confined animal feeding operations aren’t exempted from environmental laws, including new laws addressing climate change, as well as Community Right-to-Know and Superfund, as recommended by the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production; strictly monitor and regulate pollution from large CAFOs, with fines for those who violate tough air and water quality standards, and strongly support efforts to ensure meaningful local control over factory farms, as pledged during campaign and on website

40) Pesticide program—revise information requirements for antimicrobial and other pesticides to markedly scale back animal testing requirements; implement Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling (GHS) to permit the full use of available in vitro methods for skin/eye irritation, animal reduction measures for skin sensitization, and animal refinement measures for acute systemic toxicity

41) Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP)—abandon current pilot program proposed by Office of Science Coordination and Policy; strictly limit scope of EDSP to “pesticide chemicals,” per the Food Quality Protection Act; implement EDSP in rational manner as part of pesticide “registration review” process

42) Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM)—review current agency representation; implement term limits for ICCVAM representation (e.g., two years, renewable once)

43) 21st century toxicology—continue to increase resource allocation for ToxCast and other Office of Research and Development efforts to develop and validate more rapid, efficient cellular and computational models aimed at detecting toxic effects at the cellular and genomic levels; commit to substantial funding (tens of millions of dollars per year) to match current funding levels in Europe


Justice

44) 28-Hour Law—enforce the longstanding federal law limiting long-distance transport of farm animals to 28 hours or less

45) Animal cruelty reporting—collect data on animal cruelty crimes as a separate category in federal databases that collect crime statistics, to allow law enforcement to analyze trends and connections with other violence (Obama response to HSLF survey highlighted his recognition of and interest in the link between animal cruelty and human violence)

46) Animal cruelty depictions law—devote resources to ensure strongest possible appeal to Supreme Court to uphold 1999 law banning the commercial sale of videos depicting extreme and illegal acts of animal cruelty, such as “animal crush” videos in which women, often in high-heeled shoes, impale and crush to death puppies, kittens, and other small animals, catering to those with a fetish for this perverse behavior; support new legislation if necessary

47) Internet hunting and canned hunting—voice support for legislation to ban these cruel and unsportsmanlike practices, in which animals are killed via the click of a computer mouse from many miles away and are kept in a confined area to be shot for entertainment or trophies at canned hunt facilities that often provide a “guaranteed kill” to paying clients

48) Service animals—finalize proposed regulations barring wild animals as service animals under the Americans with Disabilities Act


Commerce

49) Marine mammals—convene mandated take reduction teams for marine mammals in a timely manner; publish mandated marine mammal take reduction plans to reduce fishery-related mortality on a timely basis; provide adequate funding for marine mammal stranding and disentanglement response and for annual abundance surveys of marine mammal stocks; fully fund fishery research to develop new technology to reduce incidental bycatch of fish, turtles, and marine mammals; have the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) be part of disaster contingency planning for coastal marine mammal facilities, working with USDA (if captive marine mammals get loose into coastal waters, NMFS is involved in their recovery); have NMFS verify, before issuing permits and authorizations for activities occurring abroad, that any applicant pursuing an activity on the high seas and within another country’s Exclusive Economic Zone has complied with all relevant laws of that country

50) Whaling—provide new instructions to the U.S. delegation to the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to strengthen, rather than weaken, the commercial whaling ban and once again restore U.S. leadership within the IWC; under the Bush Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/NMFS – responsible for implementing and enforcing the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling and for representing the U.S. at the annual meetings of the IWC – lead efforts to seek an agreement with the three remaining commercial whaling nations of the world (Japan, Norway, and Iceland) to allow a limited resumption of commercial whaling

51) Sharks—adopt interpretation of 2000 shark finning law that precludes all boats from carrying any finned sharks and require that any sharks landed have their fins naturally attached to their bodies, the only reliable method for banning shark finning; classify big-money shark tournaments as commercial and regulate them as part of commercial fisheries, rather than classifying these tournaments as recreational fisheries; reevaluate current system of “lumping” multiple shark species together and managing them as a single group quota (e.g., Large Coastal Sharks), since different species have different management concerns and this approach is risk prone

52) Regional Fishery Management Organizations (RFMOs)—introduce and support measures for inter-governmental fishery management agreements to reduce over-fishing and minimize or eliminate direct and indirect take of non-target species (marine mammals, sea turtles, sharks, seabirds, etc.) by implementing time and area closures and setting quotas for target species based on the best available science; introduce and support measures to reduce or eliminate take of over-exploited species that are directly targeted, including bluefin tuna, dolphins in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and many shark species; require that sharks are landed with fins naturally attached to bodies

53) Transatlantic Economic Cooperation—resist calls for a World Trade Organization (WTO) challenge to the animal testing ban under the 7th amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive

54) Surveys—include pets on census questionnaire in order to determine how many/what types of animals are kept as pets; such survey data would be useful to assess impacts on human health and well-being, develop more effective approaches to community animal control, and ensure appropriate disaster preparation


Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

55) Pets in public housing—make small change in regulations to clearly prohibit requiring declawing (as is currently the case for debarking) and ensure that Public Health Authorities know not to demand this of tenants, as they continue to do despite Appropriations Committee report language urging an end to such misrepresentations of agency policy; do not impose breed-specific bans in public housing (breed specific spay/neuter policies may be effective and appropriate, if restrictions are needed; outright bans have proven counterproductive, actually reducing public safety in some cases)


Federal Trade Commission (FTC)

56) Fur labeling—strengthen enforcement of requirement to label real fur and species; voice support for legislation like S. 3610 / H.R. 891 in the 110th Congress, as pledged during campaign in response to HSLF survey, to close loophole that agency currently interprets to exempt products with fur valued at up to $150 from labeling requirement


State

57) Animal protection positions in international negotiations—strengthen U.S. positions on animal protection and conservation issues at conventions including the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), the International Whaling Commission (IWC), the Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) to the Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region, the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) and the Agreement on the International Dolphin Conservation Program (AIDCP) (when the U.S. takes a leadership role in these conventions, other developed and developing countries follow the U.S. lead); for SPAW specifically, invest more in the Caribbean, take a stronger, more conservation (less commercial) position on issues, develop a stronger position against dolphin captures in the region, and invest more in stranding networks

58) International trade/CITES—negotiate and implement environmental cooperation agreements under Free Trade Agreements that prioritize wildlife protection and CITES enforcement as key objectives

59) Encourage ratification of treaties—encourage the U.S. to join the Convention on Migratory Species, an important international conservation treaty with 110 member countries as of November 2008 that aims to conserve terrestrial, marine and avian migratory species throughout their ranges, and the Law of the Sea, one of the most comprehensive and progressive protection agreements covering the oceans and its inhabitants, to safeguard imperiled marine habitats and specifically call for the protection and  special measures to save endangered whales, dolphins, and other marine mammals

60) Sanctions—exert more pressure on countries that do not honor their international obligations under these agreements (for example, in over eight years, the U.S. has not certified Japan under the Pelly Amendment for its ongoing whaling activities that directly undermine the IWC, and it has never issued sanctions)

61) Seals—exert pressure on Canadian government to end the commercial seal hunt, the largest marine mammal slaughter on Earth, with millions of baby seals killed for their pelts annually

62) Dolphin drive fisheries—exert pressure on Japanese government to end these annual gruesome hunts during which tens or even hundreds of dolphins are driven to shore by men in boats and then stabbed to death

63) Animal practices—encourage more humane practices in China, where dogs and cats are rounded up and brutally killed for their meat, fur, and as a substitute for a humane animal control program involving low cost rabies vaccination, spay/neuter, and pet registration; urge China to end its live bear bile industry and replace it with synthetic medicinal alternative, and to end cruel live feeding practices at zoos; call on Philippines government to better enforce its law barring trade in dog meat (estimated 500,000 dogs still killed there annually due to weak enforcement)

64) Endangered species—be stronger on threatened and endangered species outside of U.S. territory (for example, use influence and invest in helping to keep the western gray whale and vaquita, the most endangered large and small cetacean species respectively, from going extinct)

65) Transatlantic Economic Cooperation—resist calls for a WTO challenge to the animal testing ban under the 7th amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive

66) Invited expert status for animal protection community—support such designation for the International Council on Animal Protection in key Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) bodies (i.e., Working Group on Pesticides, Working Group on Manufactured Nanomaterials, Joint Meeting, and Environment Policy Committee)


U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)

67) Trophy hunting—stop funding projects (some of which currently cost taxpayers tens of millions of dollars) subsidizing and lobbying in other nations to promote trophy hunting of African elephants, leopards, and other wildlife, even in some cases in contradiction to national laws

 
United States Trade Representative (USTR)

68) Free Trade Agreements (FTAs)—include strong biodiversity conservation, animal welfare/protection, and public participation commitments in all FTAs; negotiate and implement environmental cooperation agreements that prioritize wildlife protection and CITES enforcement as key objectives; strict oversight (and, where necessary, improvement) of the citizen submission process in the environmental chapters of FTAs

69) World Trade Organization (WTO) disputes—vigorously defend against Mexico’s challenge to the U.S. dolphin-safe label at the WTO; intervene in the dispute to defend the European Union’s ban on products trade as justifiable under WTO agreements; resist calls for a WTO challenge to the animal testing ban under the 7th amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive

70) WTO agriculture issues—explicitly recognize animal welfare payments as permissible “Green Box” subsidies

71) WTO fisheries subsidies—conclude multilateral negotiations to phase out and eliminate fisheries subsidies through the WTO

72) Illegal wildlife trade—negotiate and implement bilateral or multilateral agreements concerning illegal logging and the link to illegal wildlife trade

73) Trade and Investment Framework Agreements (TIFAs)—negotiate Trade and Environment Protocols under existing U.S. TIFAs


Health and Human Services (HHS)/National Institutes of Health (NIH)

74) Chimpanzees in research—expedite retirement of all federally-owned chimpanzees to sanctuaries (including those held in a reserve colony at the Alamogordo primate facility/Holloman Air Force Base); honor and maintain breeding moratorium; support legislation and undertake administrative action to phase-out use of chimpanzees in invasive research

75) Class B—formalize the NIH policy against using “random source” dogs and cats from Class B dealers in intramural research and extend this policy to extramural research

76) 21st century toxicology—redirect budget for National Toxicology Program (NTP) intramural animal testing programs (i.e., cancer bioassay, phototoxicology, Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction, and Interagency Committee for Chemical Evaluation and Coordination) to enhance research and development efforts in the NTP High Throughput Screening Initiative and NIH Chemical Genomics Center to develop and validate more rapid, efficient cellular and computational models aimed at detecting toxic effects at the cellular and genomic levels; commit to substantial funding (tens of millions of dollars per year) to match current funding levels in Europe

77) Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM)—review current agency representation; implement term limits for ICCVAM representation (e.g., two years, renewable once)


HHS/Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

78) Antibiotics—follow recommendations of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production to phase out nontherapeutic use of antibiotics in factory farms (as required by S. 549 / H.R. 962 in the 110th Congress, for which Obama pledged support during campaign in response to HSLF survey); apply Guidance 152 to already-approved drugs, so that earlier approvals for nontherapeutic use are withdrawn; amend Guidance 152 to clearly apply to exposures other than food-borne illness, so that environmental and worker pathways are also considered; have CDC and USDA test for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pigs and compare with hospital-acquired strains in people; go forward with ban on off-label use of cephalosporin drugs in food animals, as FDA announced it would but then reversed course in November 2008

79) Pet food safety—increase enforcement; develop certification system for oversight in foreign countries or other mechanism for enforcement of U.S. standards in products imported to this country; support legislation for mandatory recall authority

80) Cloning—reevaluate approval of food from cloned animals, taking into consideration animal welfare (this reproductive strategy has resulted in a litany of maladies for the cloned animals and surrogate mothers, including stillbirths, deformities, diseases, and premature deaths); require labeling of any cloned food product, including progeny

81) Genetic Engineering/transgenics—require study of animal welfare implications before approval

82) Exotic pet trade—prohibit importation and interstate commerce of wild animals for pet trade; retain FDA ban on interstate commerce in small turtles for pet trade (in place since 1975 to protect public health, in light of risk from Salmonella transmission) and increase awareness/enforcement of ban

83) 21st century toxicology—engage in efforts to develop and validate more rapid, efficient cellular and computational models aimed at detecting toxic effects at the cellular and genomic levels; commit to substantial funding (tens of millions of dollars per year) to match current funding levels in Europe

84) Observer status for animal protection community—support such designation (through the International Council on Animal Protection in Pharmaceutical Programs) at the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) and the International Cooperation on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Veterinary Medicinal Products (VICH)

85) Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM)—review current agency representation; implement term limits for ICCVAM representation (e.g., two years, renewable once)

86) Surveys—include pets in CDC surveys in order to determine how many/what types of animals are kept as pets; such survey data could be useful to assess impacts on human health and well-being, develop more effective approaches to community animal control, and ensure appropriate disaster preparation


Defense

87) Navy sonar—emphasize that environmental protection is complementary to national security and that the former does not need to be sacrificed for the latter; require additional, effective mitigation, including seasonal and geographic restrictions, when sonar testing that may be harmful to whales, dolphins, and other marine animals is deemed absolutely necessary

88) Companion animals in war zones—explore program for soldiers who adopt pets in war zones to bring them home; advise and encourage war-torn countries to humanely and effectively conduct stray dog animal control and disease programs

89) Animal cruelty—add a clause to the Uniform Code of Military Justice explicitly prohibiting animal cruelty

90) Pig trauma training—end use of live pigs and other live animals to train military personnel in trauma treatment, shifting to effective non-animal alternatives that are already available

91) Marine mammal program—downsize and eventually eliminate the Navy’s marine mammal program, which sends dolphins and sea lions to combat zones and for routine missions (e.g., harbor patrol) to regions outside of the animals’ natural range, including outside their natural temperature tolerances

92) Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM)—review current agency representation; implement term limits for ICCVAM representation (e.g., two years, renewable once)

93) Breed-specific bans—do not impose breed-specific bans at military bases (breed specific spay/neuter policies may be effective and appropriate, if restrictions are needed; outright bans have proven counterproductive, actually reducing public safety in some cases)


Transportation

94) Wildlife crossings—promote inclusion of wildlife overpasses and underpasses in development of new roads and repairs to existing roads, to protect wildlife and reduce dangerous vehicle collisions

95) Air travel—expand definition of “animal” to require airline reporting of incidents involving animals destined to become pets (i.e., those in the pet trade) and others (e.g., animals in research, zoos, and circuses); require airplanes carrying live animals to have cargo holds suitable to support life (climate- and pressure-controlled and with baggage secured)


Education

96) Dissection choice—require or offer grant incentives for schools to provide a choice for students to participate in sophisticated, currently available humane alternatives to traditional animal dissection, such as interactive CD-ROMs, without being penalized


Treasury

97) Wildlife Habitat Conservation Easement Income Tax Incentive—support efforts to make permanent this essential incentive to help save wildlife habitat and other private land conservation efforts


U.S. Postal Service

98) Shipment of animals—prohibit shipping through the mail (where they incur high mortality rates) live reptiles, baby chicks and other birds for the pet trade, agriculture or sport

99) Animal fighting magazines—vigorously enforce the existing prohibition (7 U.S.C. 2156(c)) on use of U.S. Postal Service for dogfighting, cockfighting, or other animal fighting magazines


Consumer Product Safety Commission

100) Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM)—review current agency representation; implement term limits for ICCVAM representation (e.g., two years, renewable once)